Worship

Humans encounter the mysteries of life through ritual—whether that ritual is a complex service of worship or the way everyone at a pop concert “spontaneously” does the same thing at the same time.

And the ultimate mystery of life is Love, another name for God. In the rituals of worship, we stand in the presence of God Who knows us as we are, and loves us anyway, even at great cost to Himself.

Grace Episcopal Church is where my family has worshipped for years. It's home !

Weekly Services

No matter which of our multiple weekly worship services you attend, it will be grounded in:

The Holy Bible

The Bible contains all things necessary for salvation, for understanding how Jesus reconciles our brokenness with God, our neighbor, our world and our own selves. Our worship is soaked in Bible—we read from three to four passages from the Bible at every worship service and reflect on their meaning and application in our life (the sermon, creed, and prayers).

The Church urges us to read the Bible at home as well, using a lectionary, a daily course of reading the whole Bible from start to finish every two years.

Check our facebook page for a nearly daily meditation on the lectionary readings for that day.

The Book of Common Prayer & The Hymnal

Our words and music for worship, other than those found in the Bible, are taken from these two books, which guide Episcopalians in our corporate life and our private devotions. A large amount of both books is a quote, paraphrase or poetic version of Scripture: the rest is collected devotional treasures from 2000 years of Christian worship. Every national or regional Church in the Anglican Communion has its own versions of these texts, all based on the documents which guided the English Reformation of the 1500s but tailored to the cultural distinction of the particular Church.

Holy Baptism

From time to time, the service includes baptism. Baptism is a ritual bath which marks one’s public adoption into Christ’s family, the Church. And it entails responsibilities: to worship God and witness to His Son’s love, to repent of our sins, and to be engaged in reconciling a broken world to its Creator’s purposes. We baptize adults and children in The Episcopal Church–adults often ask for a summertime dunk in a local creek.

Holy Eucharist

Most of our worship services include the Holy Eucharist, the “great thanksgiving dinner” of the Church. Jesus told His disciples to take and eat bread, take and drink wine, in remembrance of Him. We do that regularly. All baptized Christians, regardless of your age of baptism, or the amount of water, are welcomed to join us in that memorial.